Menstrual Blood-Derived Stem Cells Investigated As Potential Stroke Therapy

Medical News Today

The potential for stem cells derived from menstrual blood to benefit stroke sufferers will be jointly investigated by researchers at the University of South Florida, Cryo-Cell International, Inc., a global stem cell company based in Oldsmar, FL, and Saneron CCEL Therapeutics, Inc. a Tampa-based biotechnology company. The research team is supported by a $100,000 grant from the Florida-based Technology Transfer/ Commercialization Partnership Grant through the James and Esther King Biomedical Research Program, and a Florida Hi-Tech Corridor Industry Seed Matching Grant from USF Connect for another $52,000.

"Recent laboratory studies using animal models have shown transplanted menstrual blood-derived stem cells produced therapeutic effects following stroke," said Dr. Cesar Borlongan, co-principal investigator and a USF neuroscientist. "We will be testing the possibility that these cells promote the growth of blood vessels and neurons that can aid in brain repair following stroke."

In previous animals studies using transplanted stem cells from menstrual blood, Dr. Borlongan and his research team found that the cells were safe and, unlike embryonic stem cells, did not run the risk of creating tumors. In their next stage of study under the new grant, the researchers will transplant menstrual blood-derived stem cells (alone as well as conditioned and treated in a variety of ways) to determine the molecular and cellular components involved in repairing damage following stroke induced chemically in laboratory mice.

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